Contact Us

Email us
Phone: +1.678.367.0981
Fax: +1.240.547.1795

Mailing Address

International Society of Arboriculture
PO Box 191
Annapolis Junction, MD 20701
United States

Physical Address

International Society of Arboriculture
270 Peachtree St NW, Suite 1900
Atlanta, GA 30303
United States

Order Delays Due to Physical Inventory

Due to ISA's annual physical inventory, orders placed between
2 p.m. EDT, Thursday, 20 June 2019, and 11:59 p.m. EDT, Friday 28 June 2019, will not ship until the week of 1 July 2019

Please plan your ordering accordingly.

We will resume regular turnaround times
1 July 2019.

Thank your for your patience.

Questions? Please call the customer service team at (678) 367-0981.

    Climbers' CornerTree Academy
    MondayTuesdayWednesday

    Dynamic Tree Sway Response after Storm Resiliency Management

    Summary

    Acclimation of trees to wind is a well-known phenomenon illustrated by open grown and most edge trees. However, tree and forest management intended to enhance the acclimation response of trees is rarely done. In this session I present prescriptions which combine approaches from silviculture and arboriculture intended to enhance the storm resilience of trees near power lines. This research and development is part of the larger STORMWISE initiative recently originated at the University of Connecticut.  I will also include preliminary results from an experiment to quantify the long-term acclimation of trees after treatment with monitoring the dynamic sway response of 13 trees along and near a power line corridor on the UCONN forest.   Sway frequency and spatial analysis of sway patterns document wind sway dynamics before and after treatment and will be used to document changes attributable to acclimation over time. 

    Presenters

    Mark Rudnicki is an Associate Professor at the University of Connecticut and has researched both the short term and long term effects of wind on trees for the past 15 years. He has developed field techniques that monitor and reconstruct tree stem motion for groups of trees and 3-D techniques that capture individual branch dynamics. He contends that by understanding how trees survive and acclimate to complex wind forces, we can develop management strategies to increase their storm resilience. 

    Climbers' CornerTree Academy
    MondayTuesdayWednesday

    True True True